Our vaccine solution

Combination vaccines are increasingly a cornerstone of infant immunization programs.

MCM partnership objective

was to leverage the extensive expertise of MSD and Sanofi Pasteur to develop a combination vaccine that uses antigens from both companies(2-3).

MCM Vaccine has developed a 6-in-1 vaccine indicated for the primary and booster vaccinations of infants and toddlers from the age of six weeks, against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, poliomyelitis and diseases caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)(1).

The European Medicines Agency granted marketing authorization for this vaccine, under the brand name of Vaxelis® - diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular, component), hepatitis B (rDNA), poliomyelitis (inactivated), and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (adsorbed) - in February 2016(4).

Please read the full information about the product posted here.

For additional information, please consult your health care provider.

Diphtheria

Diphtheria is a highly contagious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheria, which produces a toxin that can affect the throat and skin, and can cause damage to the heart and other organs and death(7,8).

TETANUS

Tetanus is a serious disease caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani, which produces a toxin that affects the body's muscles and nerves and can cause death. Usually the bacterium infects the body through a wound(9).

Pertussis (whooping cough)

Pertussis is a highly contagious bacterial infection of the respiratory tract which can cause serious illness in infants, including death(10).

Hepatitis B (Hep B)

Hep B is a viral infection of the liver and can cause cirrhosis, primary liver cancer and death(11).

Poliomyelitis (Polio)

Polio is a highly infectious disease caused by the poliovirus, which affects the nerves and can lead to muscle weakness or paralysis or death(12,13).

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Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) diseases

Hib is a bacterium that can cause severe invasive diseases in infants, such as meningitis, with neurologic sequelae and death(14).

MCM partnership objective

was to leverage the extensive expertise of MSD and Sanofi Pasteur to develop a combination vaccine that uses antigens from both companies(2-3).

MCM Vaccine has developed a 6-in-1 vaccine indicated for the primary and booster vaccinations of infants and toddlers from the age of six weeks, against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), hepatitis B, poliomyelitis and diseases caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)(1).

The European Medicines Agency granted marketing authorization for this vaccine, under the brand name of Vaxelis® - diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular, component), hepatitis B (rDNA), poliomyelitis (inactivated), and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (adsorbed) - in February 2016(4).

Please read the full information about the product posted here.

For additional information, please consult your health care provider.

(1) VAXELIS SmPC. European Medicines Agency [EMA]. 9 october 2017.
http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/EPAR_-_Product_Information/human/003982/WC500202435.pdf
(2) European Medicines Agency (EMA): Assessment report VAXELIS. http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/index.jsp?curl=pages/medicines/human/medicines/003982/human_med_001962.jsp&mid=WC0b01ac058001d124
(3) Lee AW, Jordanov E, Boisnard F, et al. DTaP5-IPV-Hib-HepB, a hexavalent vaccine for infants and toddlers. Sourced at : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14760584.2017.1268920 (Last accessed in May 2017).
(4) European Medicines Agency (EMA). EPAR summary for the public. Vaxelis. 2016. Sourced at: http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/EPAR_Summary_for_the_public/human/003982/WC500202438.pdf (Last accessed in May 2017).
(7) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Disease. Diphtheria. Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe C, eds. 13th ed. Washington, DC. Public Health Foundation. 2015;107-118. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/dip.pdf (Last accessed April 2017).
(8) World Health Organization (WHO). Immunization, Diphtheria, sourced at:http://www.who.int/immunization/topics/diphtheria/en/index.html, accessed February 2016.
(9) CDC. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Disease. Tetanus. Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe C, eds. 13th ed. Washington, DC. Public Health Foundation. 2015;341–351 https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/tetanus.pdf (Last accessed April 2017).
(10) CDC. Pertussis (Whooping cough). https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/photos.html. (Last accessed March 2017).(11) WHO. Hepatitis B vaccines. WHO position paper. Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 2009;84(40):405–420. Sourced at: http://www.who.int/wer/2009/wer8440.pdf. (Last accessed April 2017).
(12) WHO. Polio vaccines: WHO position paper, March 2016. Weekly epidemiologcal record (WER), 2016; 91:145-168. Sourced at: http://www.who.int/wer/2016/wer9112.pdf?ua=1 (Last accessed in May 2017).
(13) WHO. Poliomyelitis - Fact sheet N°114, sourced at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs114/en/, (Last accessed in May 2017).
(14) Natonal Health Service (UK). Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), sourced at: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hib/pages/introduction.aspx, (Last accessed in May 2017).